In response to: Seattle Times-Nordtvedt 12-28-1968

 

16528 37th Ave NE

Seattle, Wa. 90155

EM4-8743

7 January 1969

 

 

 

Seattle Times

Editorial Department

Seattle, WA 98111

 

Gentlemen:

 

That Mrs. Nordtverdt wonders why Mrs. O’Hair does not try to prevent Moslems and Hindus from worshiping their gods reveals much about Mrs. Nordtverdt. Were she as diligent in seeking the truth about Mrs. O’Hair as she claims to be in searching the Scriptures, she would know that Mrs. O’Hair, far from fighting Christianity, has the best interests of Christians, Moslems, Hindus, and Atheists in mind. Should Mrs. Nordtverdt wish to study the Bible, it is Mrs. O’Hair desire that she be allowed to do so with the utmost freedom, and without any possibility of having a particular point of view forced upon her (or her children) by anyone in general and by the State in particular.

The kind of religious arrogance expressed by Mrs. Nordtverdt in her letter and by our Bible-reading Space heroes during their epic journey can only serve to emphasize differences and to foster religious distrust. The framers of our Constitution knew this when they separated church and state, and Mrs. O’Hair re-emphasized this, with the support of the Supreme Court, when she successfully insured that the principle of separate church and state would remain inviolate even in our public schools.

Mrs. Nordtverdt and those of her persuasion simply must come to realize that in their search for religious freedom they cannot in good conscience violate that same right of their fellow citizens. While Christianity is not the largest world-wide religion, it is certainly the largest one in America. And as such it carries a large responsibility to treat with dignity and justice those lesser faiths and philosophies with which it shares the American heart and mind. It is to this end that Mrs. O’Hair has addressed her life.

 

Cordially yours,

 

R.G. Williscroft