Seattle

17 May 1962

 

 

Seattle Times

Editorial Department

Seattle, WA 98111

 

Gentlemen:

 

A few comments about your editorial ‘Let Them All Fly’ in the 17 May edition of the Seattle P I:

The great John Locke, father of our great federal system, has given us a picture of the origin of governments. Briefly, he pictures a group of men living as completely free individuals—a law only unto themselves. Being mainly hunters, the need for owning land did not exist. When, however, men began to regard certain bits of land as their own property, to till and grow their harvest upon, they found it necessary to protect this land from others. Possession of land led to possession of many other things, and to protect his possessions man organized. Thus government was formed.

From this groundwork laid by Locke it is easy to continue. Small tribes became numerous. Some tribes found common interests and common enemies, and soon the formed together to create larger organizations—big chiefs over little chiefs. As a result of wars and interests common to the group as a whole, the little chiefs soon lost their influence and within a short time their existence. This happened over and over on an increasing scale. The most recent uniting of small states was that of Germany, now one state and preparing to unite with other European states to form a larger union—economic now, but few will argue its inevitable political implications. We have the USSR, a uniting of small states. And, of course, the United States of America.

When we started we were really only a economic and defense union. But today we are no longer an economic union of states pledged to common defense, we are a union of people—Individually. Few and far between is he who was not born in one state, has lived in another (or two), and had business in a third. The man on Wall Street, the owner of the corner drug store, and the day laborer have one thing in common: Each is an American and each owes allegiance to the nation as a whole, and none has particularly strong ties with any one section of the nation.

Let them all fly?—as a tribute to the past, yes!—to the present, no! Is Iowa Iowa? No! Take the TVA—one local area?—yes, one state?—no; or take General Motors—one organization?—yes, influence?—well….

Few are trying to homogenize the states. It is inevitable that they must homogenize. Our common enemy and our many common interests will do the job for us. Local government will certainly remain, though government on a regional geographic basis rather than on a state basis. Union does not mean union of opinion, it means union of purpose—as more are involved, on an increasingly greater scale.

Look to the United Russian States, to the pending United European States, to the probable United African and United Asian States…. The Picture will eventually be completed: Terraunion—a union of all world states into one common organization, political, economic, educational, scientific, in every way—one world. This may take years, or it may take centuries, but it will happen.

We as Americans have a duty. We as the world's leaders in democratic principle, must strive to perfect our own union, and we must also strive to prefect the unions of others even while they are being made. Many speak of one world united in peace—first we must have one world united in purpose, and this we, as Americans, can strive for.

Yes, I am an American; I am even (for the time being) a Washingtonian, and I am also a Seattleite, but above all else, I am a Terraunionist! Until such a day as we actually have a Terraunion, I am an American to the core of my being, and to her alone do I owe my allegiance.

I may die an American, but when the Union is finally achieved

I, or my son, or my grandson will stand before all and proudly say: ‘I am a Terraunionist.’

 

Cordially yours,

 

R.G. Williscroft